Breech Business

What happens when your baby turns your birth plan upside down?

When it comes to having a baby, sometimes the best laid plans….just don’t lay correctly. You can read every book in the pregnancy section, create the most detailed birth plan, and hire a room full of doulas, but even the most influential mama-to-be may not be able turn her baby head down. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 3 to 4 percent of full-term births present as breech as late as three to four weeks before the due date, often for reasons unknown. New York City OB-GYN Dr. Meredith Halpern gives Well Rounded NY the lowdown on what happens when your baby is feet-down instead of head-down.

35 weeks: If your doctor or midwife determines that your baby is still breech at this point in your pregnancy, you may need to acknowledge a possible change in birthing plans. But, there’s still hope for a turnaround; Halpern encourages the exploration of medical alternatives that some argue may help turn your baby, from certain yoga positions to acupuncture. But it may also be the time to “wrap your head around an elective cesarean delivery,” she says, with enough time left in your pregnancy to emotionally adapt to the possibility of your new reality.

37 weeks: Once your baby is full-term, some doctors will attempt an External Cephalic Version (ECV), a manual movement to get a breech baby into a head-down position. Performed in the safety of a hospital, an ECV can be uncomfortable, and in some cases, end in an emergency C-section if the baby shows signs of distress. “If the baby is going to turn, it will usually turn right away,” Halpern says, and that happens in more than 50 percent of ECV procedures. “But unfortunately, the baby can always turn breech again two days later.”

39-40 weeks: If your baby remains in a head-up position as your due date draws near, most doctors will advocate for an elective C-section to reduce risks associated with breech delivery. “I always try to accommodate a patient’s wishes for her chosen birth experience, but the baby and mother’s health is the most important factor in how we get the baby out,” says Halpern. Breech delivery exceptions, she says, could be if a severely premature baby is already on its way out feet-down or if a second of twins is headed out breech.

Jessica Pallay

Jessica Pallay

JESSICA PALLAY is the Co-Founder and Chief Content Officer of Well Rounded NY. She is a Brooklyn mama to Libby and Elsie, and writes about all things pregnancy and new motherhood.

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